Running a Netstat

The Netstat (Network Status) command shows the active internet connections on a computer.

For PC troubleshooting you should confirm there is somewhere between 4-8 ESTABLISHED connections in total.

It can be useful for determining speed issues, dataflow problems, and data usage issues.

 

Netstat on Windows

Windows XP
Start Menu > Run > Type "cmd" > Press enter

Windows 7 / Vista
Start Menu > Programs > Accessories > right click Command Prompt > Run as Administrator > ok / allow

Once the black command prompt is open:

Type netstat -b and press Enter

It should look like the following:

Some description

The above screenshot displays the state of all ports as well as the executable file that is utilising this port.
The file name, (such as firefox.exe) and the state (Established) are the important details

 

Examples of popular downloading application, that can run in the background and cause browsing issues include
Azureus.exe
Bittorrent.exe
Bitcomet.exe
FrostWire.exe
uTorrent.exe

For PC troubleshooting you should confirm there is less then 6 ESTABLISHED connections in total

Mac OS

  1. With no other programs open, select the “Go” drop down menu and select “Utilities”
  2. From the Utilities folder, select “Network Utility”
  3. From Network Utility window select “Netstat”
  4. Select “Display the state of all current socket connections”
  5. Click “Netstat” and the results will be displayed at the bottom of the network utility window

 Some description

 

DEFINITIONS OF TCP STATES

ESTABLISHED

The port is ready to receive/send data from/to the remote peer.

TIME-WAIT

Represents waiting for enough time to pass to be sure the remote peer received the acknowledgment of its connection termination request. According to RFC 793 a connection can stay in TIME-WAIT for a maximum of four minutes known as a MSL (maximum segment lifetime).

CLOSE-WAIT

The server receives notice from the local application that it is done. The server sends its fin to the client.

LISTEN

In case of a server, waiting for a connection request from any remote client.

SYN-SENT

Waiting for the remote peer to send back a TCP segment with the SYN and ACK flags set. ('SYN-SENT' state is usually set by TCP clients)

SYN-RECEIVED

Waiting for the remote peer to send back an acknowledgment after having sent back a connection acknowledgment to the remote peer. ('SYN-RECEIVED' state is usually set by TCP servers)

FIN-WAIT-1

Indicated that the server is waiting for the application process on its end to signal that it is ready to close.

FIN-WAIT-2

Indicates that the client is waiting for the server's fin segment (which indicates the server's application process is ready to close and the server is ready to initiate its side of the connection termination)

LAST-ACK

Indicates that the server is in the process of sending its own fin segment (which indicates the server's application process is ready to close and the server is ready to initiate its side of the connection termination )

CLOSED

Connection is closed